Message Definition

What exactly is and isn't a "message"? It's a term commonly found in, but not limited to, the SmallTalk community.

A "message" is a bounded package of information that can be/has been/is in the process of being delivered from a sender to a recipient.

That's all. The rest is explanation. Use of 'message' tends to imply the following:

The term message is almost always used in the context of MessagePassing. MessagePassing communication is important to ObjectOriented programming and in InterProcessCommunication (e.g. ErlangLanguage processes and ActorsModel are both based heavily on MessagePassing).

MessagePassing discriminates from a variety of other communication mechanisms:

The Message itself - a bounded package of information that can be/has been/is in the process of being delivered from a sender to a recipient - certainly distinguishes from data streams (which have sender and recipient, but are not bounded). It also is distinguishable from reactive expressions, constraints, and shared memory resources - none of which have specific recipients or senders.

Beyond that, 'Message' discriminates from the process of MessagePassing in the same sense that Mail can be distinguished from act of pushing bags between the post office and the mail trucks.

How is a message distinct from the following?

I'm not getting the message (bad pun). I still don't see a useful distinction.

If you are interested in elucidation, you must ask the right questions, or at least clarify the nature of your blindness. Do you suspect MessageDefinition makes a distinction, but find yourself ignorant of its utility? If so, where? Or are you seeking a distinction where you suspect MessageDefinition makes none? If so, why? Be precise.

The rules are not clear. I'd like to see the rules stated, and where and how the test scenarios pass or fail the rules, hopefully with unambiguous descriptions.

See top of page, to wit: A "message" is a bounded package of information that can be/has been/is in the process of being delivered from a sender to a recipient. Can you identify both a sender and a recipient? Is there a package of information? Is it bounded? Etc. Now please stop quibbling. If you're bored, go do something.

Hey rudeboy, your definition is vague. Many things fits those. Bits are ALWAYS jumping around from spot A to spot B ("sender" and "recipient"). "Packaged" and "bounded" is also too vague, and often relative. It's a Handwavy buzzword and I'm calling people on it even if it's painful for them to face the ugly truth.

To reasonably claim a definition is "vague", you must first find a relevant borderline case in reality. Can you do so?


FebruaryTen

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